Ondrej Cechvala

Photography is not only something I enjoy, but it also pays the bills. You’ll either run into me photographing a wedding or wandering the world, camera in hand. I travel everywhere, from the Arctic Circle to the Equator. To me, Home is anywhere where you can find people with a smile. I enjoy collecting stories of people and places which I later arrange into longer photographic series. Some of these can be found on my website.

Colorful Mexico

Mexico has a varied reputation among travelers. On one hand, we picture monumental pyramids and a turquoise-blue coast. On the other hand, some travelers only picture drug cartels and immense poverty. This may make a photographer wonder if this country is at all worth visiting. My response is absolutely Yes. Let me elaborate on why I think so.

Winter Photography Exercise Create a Winter Photo Series

Why should you make a winter photo series? First of all, because it’s an excellent skill-building exercise. Winter provides the right conditions for creatively working with various motifs, composition, and above all, color. Plus, you don’t have to search hard to find elements in a solid white landscape to draw the series together. These photo-worthy elements pop up on their own in a bleak winter landscape. Last but not least, you can bring a friend or furry companion along and have lots of fun at the same time.

Photograph minimalistically and find beauty in simplicity

One growing trend of our age is the search for simplicity. It’s expressed in nearly everything—from our style of dress to what we eat to the buildings where we live. This minimalism also has its place in art. And art may have stood at its beginnings. Remember the pioneering Bauhaus school, which emphasized the use of basic colors and shapes, clean lines, and overall clarity across all styles. This school’s heritage lives on in many fields—including photography. 

6 Women That Changed Photography 

Today, seeing a female photographer on the street, camera in hand, is something we all take for granted. However, it wasn’t always this way. Just one hundred years ago, a female photographer in public would draw attention to herself or be looked down upon. The role of women was completely different in the more patriarchal society of the time. For this reason, we have tremendous admiration for these trail-blazing artists that were able to break through societal barriers and amaze the world with their work.

Photography and criticism: How to accept constructive criticism and where seek it out

Every photographer knows how important it is to master their camera, know the principles of composition, and understand light. Even so, it is criticism and acknowledging opposing opinions that truly help their photography develop. Feedback is what gets you out of your comfort zone and forces you to further develop your skills. It’s critical that you are able to not only accept constructive criticism, but also make it work to help you further your photography. 

Humor in photography – How to capture funny moments

Your photography has the potential to amuse, even if it wasn’t your original intention. In this article, we are discussing laughter that you provoke. Whether you are creating a photo series, taking photos for social media, or just sharing with family and friends, it never hurts to use a humorous moment to change things up a bit. As a result, you’ll be able to observe how the focused expression of your viewer is suddenly replaced with a smile, or if you’re lucky, with bouts of laughter. 

Photography in the trenches of war – 5 famous war photographers 

You’d be hard-pressed to find a more dangerous and precarious genre of photography than war photography. The photographer often goes so far as to risk their own life for their work. You may ask yourself why these photographers go to such lengths and what good may come of it.  A rather poignant response is given by one of the most compelling war photographers of all time, James Nachtwey: “I have been a witness, and these pictures are my testimony. The events I have recorded should not be forgotten and must not be repeated.” This response is simultaneously a strong appeal for humanism that can be found in the work of many photographers who work in combat zones. 

8 Tips for Tackling Documentary Photography 

Few photographic genres are plagued by as many misunderstandings as documentary photography. We photographers have come to classify every shot that isn’t prearranged into this genre. It’s most often confused with reportage. And meanwhile the two are easy to tell apart! Reportage is usually a short-term record of some event. While documentary work is always long-term. Its results never arrive immediately, and building up a gripping series can even take years.

Reportage Photography: How to Take Gripping Reportage That Tells Stories

In reportage, it’s important to be in the right place at the right time, and also to press the trigger at the right moment. That’s definitely the foundation, but it’s just as important to know how to put together a gripping story from the photos you get. Like every other story, a reportage should pull the audience in, keep them in suspense, and bring them a certain denouement. Now let’s take a look at how to tell it through photos.

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