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Image Stacking for Landscape Photos: Use Layers to Tackle High Dynamic Range Images

For a landscape to be truly spectacular, you’ll want the sun in the frame so you can observe the interplay of lights and shadows. The issue is that this puts unrealistic demands on your camera’s sensor. A common solution is to take several images at different brightness levels. But how do you combine them? Auto HDR doesn’t always work. So for greater control over your results, there is a manual process you can use to ensure your results are exactly what you want.

How to Replace a Dull Sky

Surely you’ve run into this before: you’re in a place that you want to show off through some great photos, but the weather is against you. There’s a dull gray sky with no room for creativity. You have a subject that’s interesting, but the rest is boring. In most cases you can make use of tone mapping, gradient filters and the like, but there are also cases where there’s no adjustment that can make the sky look good, and yet something does have to be done with it. There is one last resort—replacing the sky.

How to Sharpen Your Photos: Beat the Blurry Blues

In photography, sharpness is everything. Blurry photos generally don’t belong anywhere but the trash. But sometimes you’ll take a photo that’s great except for some blurriness. It’s no wonder, since even things like lens quirks can get in the way of sharpness. And meanwhile, if the blurriness isn’t too bad, then sharpening on your computer can save the picture.

How Do You Edit RAW? Actually, It’s Easy

Almost everyone who’s spent more than a little time with a camera shoots to RAW. After all, RAW lets you make bad photos average, average photos excellent, and excellent photos even better. That’s because it offers significantly more image data than, for example, JPG. And thanks to this it gives you room for much better edits. So let’s take a look at how to work with it.

How to Adjust Exposure and Dynamic Range 

Almost every photo requires at least some adjustment to exposure and dynamic range. With RAW photos in particular, you can get more out of them than you may have expected. This comes in handy if you didn’t watch your exposure settings when shooting or you are shooting a scene with harsh highlights and dark shadows. A common example is a landscape or portrait photo where a part of the photo contains a bright sky and another is covered in shadows.

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