File for month: 7 / 2015

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Make It Gritty. Make It Harsh. Make It Low Key

Just as some edits and lighting styles give you a soft-feeling photo, the opposite exists too. Meet the opposite of High Key. Meet Low Key... and learn to create harsher, grittier photos. You can use it for photos of senior citizens, photos of manly men (often the same thing!)... and even for nudes. Read on to find out how to create Low Key photos.

Editing to Highlight Your Subject

Today we’ll once again be taking a look at fixing a specific picture—to help you bridge the gap from theory to real-world work on fixing real-world photos. This shot was taken in poor light conditions—under hard light. We’ll be softening the light to get a picture that’s easier on the eyes. We will use Zoner Photo Studio for all the needed edits. You’re very welcome to follow along with us—just download the photo above and then imitate our steps.

Send a Paper Postcard. Zoner Postcard!

Have you already sent a postcard using the Zoner Postcards app? Yes? No? No matter—the holidays are here: a great time to tickle your family with a unique postcard. It’s really simple, and you also get a chance to win a brand-new Google Nexus 6 or iPhone6!

Get to Know Your First Camera

Have you just started using your first camera? Are you but still at the stage where you don’t really know your camera—but you’re already sure that you love photography? Then this article is for you. The camera in your hands is probably a nice compact or a beginner DSLR. Read on for some beginners’ tips that will help you to get to know your camera.

How a Cool Idea Became a Cool Picture

Inspiration for photos can come from anywhere—even from a video. In today’s article, we’ll be following the story of a photo inspired by a Pink Floyd video: the birth of its idea, the shoot preparation, the shoot itself, and the post-editing. If you like the picture’s final style, then try to recreate it! All you’ll need is a camera and a lens, plus Zoner Photo Studio for the post-editing.

How to Use Exposure Modes

A camera’s built-in light meter measures the level of incident light and adjusts aperture, shutter speed, and ISO based on that. Your exposure mode setting determines how your camera will work with the light levels that it measures. Depending on the mode, the camera will either adjustments fully automatically, or leave you a certain amount of control over a photo’s final tonality. Meanwhile in manual mode, the meter has no effect on the exposure settings at all. What exposure modes do DSLRs offer and how are they useful? We’ll be answering these questions in today’s article.

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